Loading...
 
ESA > Join & Share > Blogs > EO Research and Beyond

EO Research and Beyond

What RSS can do for supporting your EO Research, application or service
Created by
RSS feed

The RSS CloudToolbox service

Succeeding the experience of the SSEP CloudToolbox service provided by RSS to the Geohazard user community since April 2013, ESA recently decided to extend the CloudToolbox service to the entire EO data user community, in order to assess its suitability to support EO research and data exploitation. 

The extended RSS CloudToolbox service can provide authorised registered ESA EO-SSO users with customised virtual machines (VMs) hosted on an European cloud infrastructure. Such VMs are allowed to access ESA RSS data archives through high-speed network connection and can be equipped with resources (typically 1-4 CPUs, 1-8GB RAM and up to 1TB storage) aligned with the initial user requirements. 

Users have full control of their CloudToolboxes, which are typically provided with an initial credit of 100 hours of up time and can be powered on/off by the user according to the workplan. Furthermore, where needed resources can be temporarily increased to support more demanding processing requirements (e.g. up to 20 CPUs, up to 40GB RAM or up to 10TB storage). If authorised, the initial credit can be extended as well. 

The VMs are provided with pre-installed software supporting EO data exploitation, like Sentinel-1 Toolbox, NEST, BEAM, GAMMA, Matlab, etc. Additional software can be installed on request. 

Details on service access and usage are available in the CloudToolbox FAQ page.

The service is subject to ESA G-POD Terms and Conditions, Cloud Providers Terms and Conditions and CloudToolbox Service Conditions, as detailed in the Service Terms section of the RSS CloudToolbox wiki page. 

The service is free of charge for authorised EO data users and provides flexible and easily accessible processing resources.

We expect the RSS CloudToolbox service to complement existing RSS solutions and tools, and to enhance RSS support to the productivity of the EO data user community. 

Interested users are invited to contact eo-gpod@esa.int

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int 







 

 

RSS support to the SAR Community

In the past months RSS dedicated significant effort to enhance the support to the SAR community. On the algorithm development side, we have supported CNR-IREA to further develop and fine-tune the G-POD InSAR SBAS service based on the full chain of their P-SBAS DInSAR algorithm. 

Indeed, from November 10th, 2014, the InSAR SBAS service has been made available on G-POD to interested RSS users for processing SAR data from the ESA archives. The service requires dataset selection over a specific AOI together with parameters/thresholds setting, and allows unsupervised processing providing in output geocoded interferograms, mean deformation velocity maps and deformation time series. 

About 30 Computing Nodes are made available to support the SBAS processing, equally shared between ESA and CNR-IREA. In fact, a federated G-POD cluster of 15 Computing nodes has been set-up at CNR-IREA, and other 15 Computing nodes physically at ESRIN are dedicated to G-POD SBAS processing. 

Results of this activity have been presented at the “Big Data from Space” conference (BiDS) held in ESRIN from November 12th to 14th.

In November, the new Sentinel-1 toolbox has been integrated into G-POD. Furthermore, Near Real Time ingestion of Sentinel-1 data from the Scientific Data Hub (scihub.esa.int) into the G-POD catalogue has been also activated. Data made available via SciHub are therefore available to RSS users for G-POD processing as well. 

Interested users are invited to contact eo-gpod@esa.int

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

 

RSS Customer Survey 2014

Last month we have offered to RSS registered users the opportunity to participate in the RSS Customer Survey 2014 to provide feedback on the RSS Service and share with us expectations and requirements for the coming period. 

The survey (by the way, it will be open until next Jun 30th) consists of 10 questions. I will share with you in this post the results of a few questions from the RSS survey, based on the feedback from 33 users. 

 

Question 1: The ESA Research and Service Support (RSS) service is modelled to support some steps of the Earth Observation research process, in particular those belonging to its core phase such as "EO data processing" and "Data Analysis support" (see "The 5-level RSS service model" for more details). To what extent you consider the current RSS service model adequate to fulfil your research requirements as an EO scientist? 

Result: On a scale from 1 to 5, almost 60% answered positively (4) or very positively (5) to this question, and another 27% answered 3. In total, almost 85% of the answers was non-negative or positive, while only three users answered 2 (we will verify directly with them how the service can be improved, of course considering their comments if available). One user marked 1, but specified that he does not use the RSS Service. Another user did not mark any score.

Free comments to this question range from “It is difficult to find out data or information on the web site” to “The ESA RSS service is perfect”. However, as said, we will go through each single answer and associated comments to identify and plan possible service enhancements. 

Question 2: One of the core steps of the EO research process is the data processing. ESA RSS service supports such step by means of the G-POD service that implies hand-in-hand cooperation between the scientist (or Principal Investigator) and RSS staff as described in the post "How long it takes to integrate an algorithm into G-POD". To what extent you consider adequate the G-POD service to understand and fulfil your processing requirements?

Result:  Same story as above. Only three users answered 2 and one user answered 1 (the same of Question 1). Other RSS users not acquainted with G-POD simply did not marked any score (3 out of 33). 

Question 4: We have entered the Sentinel era on April 3rd, 2014. With the launch of Sentinel-1 we have the opportunity to extend the period covered by global radar dataset (ERS, ASAR) stored in the RSS DataFarm and available to RSS users via the G-POD catalogue for on-demand processing. To what extent you are interested in timeseries processing involving ASAR/Sentinel-1 data over specific areas of interest?

Result: Here we have almost 88% of the answers marking 4 (6 out of 33) or 5 (23/33). Three people marked 2. One user did not mark any score.

Free comments to this question range from “A straightforward API to access data” to “I hope, we (researchers) can use Sentinel data freely and fast”. Also for this question and of course for all others as well, we will identify and plan possible service enhancements.

If you have not participated yet in the RSS Customer Survey 2014, you still have time until June 30th. Your feedback will help us to further improve the service that we provide to the Earth Observation research community. 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

 

New RSS testbeds for EO missions

One of the RSS success stories of the last years is the G-POD testbed for the Earth Explorer mission SMOS, which makes available a flexible test environment to support on one hand the ESA calibration team for L1 calibration, and on the other hand the Expert Support Laboratories (ESLs) for L2 Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity pre-validation. 

When these testbeds were presented the first time to the scientific community at the SMOS Conference in Arles in 2011, only few versions of the 3 processors were supported, as shown in the following table: 

SMOS TESTBED (SEPTEMBER 2011)

SMOS L1 TESTBED

SMOS L2 SOIL MOISTURE TESTBED

SMOS L2 OCEAN SALINITY TESTBED

Processor: Level 1A, 1B, 1C

Supported versions: 3.46, 5.00, 5.01

Reference data series: L0, L1A, L1B, L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per Operational environment 

Processor: SM L2, SM L2 post-processing

Supported versions: 4.00, 4.01

Reference data series: L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per CESBIO reprocessing

 

Processor: OS L2          

Supported versions: 5.00

Reference data series: L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per Operational environment

 

In September 2011, the SMOS testbed had been announced at the SMOS Conference and then made available to the users few weeks later. At that time the SMOS mission was less than 2 years old, therefore the entire mission dataset was less than half than today in terms of volume.  

Since then, several new versions of the L1 processor have been integrated, as shown in the table below: 

SMOS TESTBED (MARCH 2014)

SMOS L1 TESTBED

SMOS L2 SOIL MOISTURE TESTBED 

SMOS L2 OCEAN SALINITY TESTBED 

Processor: Level 1A, 1B, 1C

Supported versions: 3.46, 5.00, 5.01, 5.02, 5.03, 5.04, 5.05, 6.00, 6.01, 6.10, 6.11

Reference data series: L0, L1A, L1B, L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per Operational environment 

Processor: SM L2, SM L2 post-processing

Supported versions: 4.00, 4.01

Reference data series: L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per CESBIO reprocessing

 

Processor: OS L2          

Supported versions: 5.00, 5.50

Reference data series: L1C (reprocessed)

Auxiliary data baseline: as per Operational environment

 

 

In fact, during the last 2 years and half, a new version of the L1 processor has been delivered every 3-4 months, on average. As a new version was delivered, it was integrated into G-POD and tested (in 1-2 weeks typically), and then in the light of test results and campaign specific user requirements (data volume, type of products required, timeline, etc) the necessary processing resources were planned accordingly, in order to satisfy our SMOS users’ expectations. Once completed the processing, products were (and are) immediately made available to the users for supporting their validation activity. 

The figure below represents the SMOS testbed support process, where the steps under RSS responsibility are enclosed by the golden ellipse, and the other steps are under the responsibility of the SMOS calibration team. 

 

As some of you probably recall, G-POD capacity can be flexibly expanded by resorting to Cloud resources. Such flexible expansion has allowed to meet demanding SMOS user requirements as well (in terms of hardware resources and challenging deadlines). Considering only last year (2013), RSS on-demand processing (G-POD + Cloud) delivered more than 120.000 (one hundred and twenty thousand!) CPU hours for completing about 300.000 jobs. Roughly 20% of these jobs was related to SMOS testbeds, and almost 20% of that was delivered by means of Cloud resources. 

The same successful model can be applied to other sensors. Indeed, the next example will be the SWARM testbed, that has been set-up during the last months and is now ready for the users. 

In the light of the measurable benefits created by the SMOS testbed, it is worth to consider whether dedicated testbeds should be set-up for the coming Earth Observation missions as well. 

 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int 

RSS realizations in 2013 and planned work

Realizing what anticipated one year ago, RSS has made available new resources, capabilities and features to EO data users during the last twelve months. Indeed, two new services have been transferred to operations, MEA and SSEP. Furthermore, existing services have been upgraded or migrated to newer versions.  All RSS services (SSE, GPOD, J&S, OGC service, etc), included the new ones, are now accessible via the ESA Single Sign-on mechanism, that allows access to all RSS resources by signing-in just once.

The first new service, MEA (Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis), a deliverable of the ASIM project, is an innovative web application allowing change pattern identification at global scale for land, atmosphere and cryosphere, and multi-feature multi-sensor correlation analysis. The service has been successfully presented to selected EO research communities, and recently INGV (Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) expressed its interest in becoming an end-user of this environment.

The second new service, SSEP (SuperSites Exploitation Platform), is entered in its operational phase since March. It relies on the cloud infrastructure made available by selected providers, and provides access to SAR data over geo-hazard related sites around the world via VA4 (Virtual Archive 4), the ESA contribution to SuperSites initiative. Moreover, the SSEP service provides geo-hazard scientists with cloud processing capacity via the Cloud Toolbox service. Such service makes available to EO data users interested in the geo-hazard domain, custom virtual machines on the ESA/HelixNebula cloud infrastructure. Such a custom machine, called CloudToolbox,  can be equipped with the latest ESA and thirty-party tools for processing SAR data (e.g. GAMMA, NEST, etc...), and allows faster access to VA4 data since both, machine and data, are physically hosted on the same cloud infrastructure.

SSEP resources will be consolidated and further improved next year. Besides the enhanced version of the CloudToolbox service, it is under discussion the opportunity of creating a federated ecosystem around the Virtual Archive 4 and a geospatial data  collaborative environment to support collaborative editing and user-generated content sharing. 

On the G-POD side, besides the recent migration to the version 2.3.2, many EO data processing campaigns have been conducted throughout the year for several PIs (as usual). Also SMOS and ASAR testbeds have delivered significant value to our customers in the RSS supply chain, in these cases respectively the SMOS QWG and the ASAR Quality Team. While for the ASAR testbed exclusively existing G-POD resources at UK-PAC have been used for completing the processing on-time, for meeting the deadlines indicated by the SMOS QWG, on a couple of occasions, it has been necessary to activate cloud resources to elastically extend the nominal G-POD processing capacity, according to the flexible model presented at the recent ESA Living Planet Symposium

The new G-POD SWARM testbeds have been implemented as planned within the launch date and are currently under testing. Both Expert Support Laboratories and industry involved in the development of SWARM processors can benefit from the use of these testbeds starting from the beginning of next year. 

Regarding the support to EO Communication and Education, during the first quarter of this year a new wide audience Virtual Reality 3D facility has been set-up in the ESRIN Big Hall. This new set-up enhances the RSS support to the ESRIN Communication Office activities, facilitating the management of large groups of visitors, during special events like the Open Days and Researchers’ Night that involve several hundreds of people at a time. Also, the RSS OGC service has been upgraded and customised for supporting EO Education activities. The new EduSpace catalogue based on the RSS OGC service is on-line since several months. Some 2TB of customized data for supporting educational activities have been already ingested in the catalogue and approximately the same volume is expected to be ingested in the next months. 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

RSS at the ESA Living Planet Symposium in Edinburgh and Helix Nebula General Assembly in Heidelberg

Last month RSS participated in 2 major events, the ESA Living Planet Symposium in Edinburgh and the Helix Nebula General Assembly in Heidelberg.

As some of you probably recall, RSS is involved in the SSEP (SuperSites Exploitation Platform) project, that is the ESA’s flagship project for EO application deployment onto the “Helix Nebula” cloud computing infrastructure. Earlier this year, the RSS SSEP service has been transferred to operations and provides on the one hand access to Geohazard Supersites related radar data via Virtual Archive 4, and, on the other hand, cloud processing capacity via the Cloud Toolbox service. During the first 6 months of operations, almost 3TB of data or 13,000 products have been accessed via VA4 by an average number of 50 monthly users, and 9 customized Cloud Toolbox Virtual Machines have been provided to interested EO scientists. Besides such operational activities, RSS has also conducted extensive pilot tests on 2 selected Cloud Brokering layers coupled with relevant cloud providers, and on the EGI Federated Cloud resorting to processing resources from 3 European Research Centres connected to GEANT via their respective National Research and Education Network. The results of these pilots have been presented at the Helix Nebula General Assembly in Heidelberg on Sep 24th.

Two weeks before at the ESA Living Planet Symposium in Edinburgh, RSS welcomed EO researchers at one of the ESA stands, answering to questions on EO data access, processing on-demand, cloud resources and future enhancements of the current Research and Service Support service. Also, RSS supported ESA EO Educational activities providing presentations based on 3D Earth Observation images. Several presentations per day have been given to groups of visitors and students from September 9th to 12th. 

Furthermore, the RSS model has been presented in the “Research Support and Technology” session on September 13th. As mentioned in the abstract of the presentation, the proposed model is centred on the RSS Grid Processing On-Demand (G-POD) service, that in the last couple of years has started a successful evolution process to provide the required flexibility, in terms of data management and processing capacity, to both EO research projects and EO algorithm validation activities, thus confirming its already demonstrated relevance to EO data exploitation for the coming Sentinel era as well. 

The RSS model presentation given at the ESA Living Planet, named “Tools and processes for EO Research”, introduces the generic research process and drills-down into the PI-RSS interaction process. Then, it describes the solution adopted to provide flexible resources and its results, followed by some facts, figures and success stories. 

It is worth to report the “Conclusion and Future directions” slide content here below as well (copy/paste from my presentation): 

Conclusions 

• PIs have significant savings: time (~months), processing capacity (~hundreds of CPU hours) and storage capacity (~tens of TBs)

• Such savings could contribute to free scientists’ resources and thus enable enhanced scientific productivity

• RSS is a reliable and firm ESA commitment towards the scientific community (delivered since 2007 and being extended to the future)

Future directions 

• Research Support Service for scientific exploitation of Sentinel data is planned (see LP 2013 Opening Session)

• Thematic Exploitation Platform initiative announced by ESA (EMITS RFI of 02/09/2013) has been inspired by the experience of the RSS model

 

 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

How long it takes to integrate an algorithm into G-POD

Integrating an EO algorithm into RSS GPOD is a challenging task. The main GPOD process steps are represented in the figure below, involving on one side the Principal Investigator and the RSS Team on the other side. PIs and RSS need to work hand-in-hand in order to see the process through to its successful completion. 

Moreover, besides specific technical skills needed for understanding and effectively operating our Grid/Cloud environment, other peculiar skills are required to RSS Team members involved in the GPOD process, for optimising the interaction with the PI and minimising the algorithm integration / upgrade cycle time. 

Indeed, the comprehension of scientific requirements has proven to be fundamental to the success of the RSS GPOD process, as well as the ability to share the same language and goal orientation with the PI. 

Therefore, key RSS skills are: 

•        Remote sensing background / EO data exploitation expertise

•        Software development /software integration

•        Virtualization technology

•        Grid / Cloud technology

•        Operations and Maintenance

•        Scientific goal orientation

 

The quantitative demonstration of the RSS GPOD process effectiveness is the impressive improvement of the algorithm integration cycle time. In fact, with respect to some years ago, when the current process was not yet in place, the average GPOD integration time has been reduced from 6 months to 4 weeks.

In the past couple of years, the algorithm integration/upgrade cycle time optimisation has determined a number of RSS GPOD success stories. Some of these are introduced in the extended abstract of the paper that we will present to the coming ESA Living Planet Symposium in Edinburgh (attached here below). 

 

Tools and processes for EO Research_ESA Living Planet_extended abstract.docx

 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

RSS for EO Communication

RSS provides support to ESRIN Communication activities since many years, besides supporting Earth Observation Research and data exploitation. A few months ago, as anticipated in my previous post, a new 3D facility has been set-up in the ESRIN “Big Hall”, thus enabling the delivery of 3D Earth Observation related movies and interactive images of our planet to groups of hundreds of people on the occasion of public events. 

In fact, during the ESRIN Open Days 2013, many numerous groups of students from Italian schools together with their teachers, have enjoyed an immersive 3D experience that virtually brought them on-board the ISS (International Space Station) with the ESA Astronaut Paolo Nespoli. Moreover, the 3D environment has also allowed students and teachers to visualise images derived by ESA Earth Observation missions, such as the GOCE Earth’s gravity field model and the Volcanic “breathing” derived by ERS 1 and 2 data. In total, 1500 people attended the event on March 18th and 19th, exceeding in only two days the aggregated number of ESRIN visitors during the previous 12 months. 

The old 20-seat Virtual Reality Theatre has been aligned to the new 3D Big Hall installation in terms of software, workstation and graphic cards, such that we can deliver the same range of 3D contents (movies, clips, interactive images, etc) to groups of ESRIN visitors by either facilities. Depending on size and type of the groups, we will make available the one facility or the other, thus providing improved ease of management and flexibility to Communication activities. 

RSS supports the creation of 3D contents as well. For example, we can produce 3D interactive presentations starting from satellite data (e.g. the Earth’s gravity field model and the Volcanic “breathing” mentioned above). Also, we can produce 3D animation of a satellite launch (like the Cryosat launch also presented at the ESRIN Open Days 2013). Moreover, we can produce 3D interactive images of spacecraft to any degree of detail, based on its technical drawings (e.g. GOCE satellite, gradiometer and electromagnetic bars). 

With the coming ESA missions (PROBA-V, SWARM, Sentinels, etc), many new 3D contents can be produced and delivered by RSS to large groups of ESRIN visitors. 

The interactive rendering of RSS 3D contents via standard web browser could be also planned for exposing to internauts as well the flavour of the on-site immersive 3D experience. 

Join&Share itself (aka J&S, it is the RSS CMS containing the post that you are reading right now!) plays a role in supporting EO Communication activities. During the latest semester, J&S monthly stats report on average more than 1400 visits and 7,000 pageviews. Of course, these numbers can be further improved, but, however, their higher than 10% yearly increase demonstrate growing interest for J&S as an e-collaboration and communication tool. In fact, we are now supporting the creation on J&S of a new e-Community (i.e. Wiki and Forums dedicated to one of the ESA Earth Explorers) that will be published in the near future. 

 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

RSS novelties for the new year

The new year will bring some interesting novelties to RSS. Services providing new capabilities and functionalities to our EO data users will be transferred to operations, and the infrastructure as well will be further enhanced. Moreover, the single sign-on mechanism will enable registered users to access all RSS services by a unique login. On the on-demand processing service side, following the SMOS and ASAR testbeds success stories, new testbeds will be made available on G-POD. On the communication support side, besides the existing 20-seat Virtual Reality Theatre a new facility will be set-up to deliver 3D Earth Observation related shows to a wider audience.

The first service that will be transferred to operations is N-MEA (New Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis), a deliverable of the ASIM project. N-MEA is an innovative web application allowing change pattern identification at global scale for land, atmosphere and cryosphere, and multi-feature multi-sensor correlation analysis. Recently N-MEA has been successfully installed and tested in the RSS staging area before queuing it in the transfer to operations pipeline. We expect the system to be available to all RSS registered users in January. 

The RSS single sign-on mechanism is currently in the acceptance phase. It will allow access to all RSS resources (SSE, GPOD, J&S, N-MEA, OGC service, etc) by signing-in just once. RSS users having at the moment a non-ESA EO-SSO account in J&S have been already invited to follow the registration procedure. For users registered on other RSS environments instructions will be provided as needed. We expect the RSS single sign-on in place around the end of January. 

On the on-demand processing side, the GOCE User Toolbox, included the variance/covariance modules, has been integrated into GPOD and the GOCE testbed will follow in the coming weeks. Also, the GPOD-DDS service will be made available to selected users from the TIGER project community for satellite dissemination to receiving stations in Africa of EO data produced by GPOD services, like MGVI and Phaveos for vegetation, and FAIRE for flood detection/monitoring. 

A wide audience Virtual Reality 3D facility will be made available in the ESRIN Big Hall from the first quarter of the new year. This novel set-up based on new state-of-the-art stereoscopic projectors will consolidate and enhance the RSS support to the ESRIN Communication Office activities, facilitating the management of large groups of visitors, both during routine visits, gathering up to several tens of visitors, and special events like the Researchers’ Night involving hundreds of people. 

We also plan to transfer to operations the new CIOP (Cloud Operational Pilots) and SSEP (SuperSites Exploitation Platform) services in Q1. CIOP, currently in its commissioning phase, is an Earth Observation Sandbox service that will allow interested Principal Investigators to integrate EO algorithms on their own into a cloud based on-demand processing infrastructure. SSEP is the ESA’s flagship project for EO application deployment onto the “Helix Nebula” cloud computing infrastructure, currently in its Phase 2, or services transfer phase, and will enter the last phase in January, providing 14-month operational service to scientific users from the geo-hazard community. 

 

For more information 

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta@esa.int

Models for Scientific exploitation of EO data

Last October 11th and 12th more than 40 people from European space agencies, universities and research centres, and industry convened at ESRIN, Frascati, Rome to participate in the Workshop “Models for Scientific exploitation of EO data”.

The 21 presentations given during the workshop organized by the HMA Architecture Working Group, provided valuable inputs that will be considered to build a common vision of the path towards the achievement of the following high level objectives: 

-       definition of a harmonized research and service support model and related processes 

-       identification of technology, harmonisation requirements and service models finalized to the federation of payload data ground segment services to the scientific community 

 

Principal key success factors emerged from the various presentations are: 

-       scientists concurrent involvement in all phases of EO service delivery projects

-       coordinated inter-agency scientific research calls

-       coordinated effort between universities/research centres and industry for new EO multi-mission/multi-sensor methodologies

-       EO research and service development support

-       appropriate research support team knowledge, experience and skill mix

-       EO results validation support

-       higher level products from EO missions

-       community building

-       remote processing capacity available to the scientific community

-       appropriate infrastructure in terms of processing, storage, connectivity, flexibility

-       formats/interfaces/procedure harmonisation and standardisation

-       separation of production environment from “scientific” environments

-       European infrastructure: direct multi-mission and in-situ data access, and processing capacity

-       scientific and industrial competitive advantages mutually reinforced in a multi-level approach

-       community-centric and collaborative Earth science exploitation platforms

-       “Earth Web” model rather than a simple “Earth Box”

 

In my view, the various contributions can converge towards a shared vision. The list above indicates that funding and resources made available by space agencies could produce significantly more value through co-ordinated and mutually reinforcing processes rather than separated mutually excluding processes, by reducing the risk of effort duplication, by resorting to the necessary scientific knowledge in all value adding steps of the EO supply chain, by removing rigidity and barriers to access data and processing resources, by stimulating EO community building, by federating resources to build a collaborative European Earth science infrastructure. 

In the next weeks we will invite interested agencies, universities and research centres, and service companies that participated in the Workshop, to evaluate together with us to what extent the resources currently available can be federated. Once completed, the analysis required by such evaluation will enable the identification of the necessary steps to be planned for progressing towards the Workshop’s high level objectives. 

 

For more information

RSS Portal: rssportal.esa.int

Author's email: giancarlo.rivolta at esa.int 

Page: 2/4Last Page1234